French beauty Co guide to dealing with Eczema

October 26, 2020

French beauty Co guide to dealing with Eczema

As one of the most common skin conditions seen by GPs down under, today 1 in 4 Australian suffers from atopic dermatitis or most commonly called eczema. Earlier this month, the Eczema Awareness Day put into light some of the key symptoms and treatments available on the market and reiterated how it can affect Eczema sufferers’ confidence on so many levels.

Like most chronic diseases there are no cure as such, however preventative and maintenance treatments with emollients (moisturisers) and corticosteroids during flare-ups can really help keeping symptoms at bay.

What is Eczema? What are the symptoms?

In very short terms, it is an inflammation of the skin. The most common type is atopic eczema, which often comes with the following symptoms: dry skin, itchiness, thickened areas, red inflamed or flaky skin. 

Atopy also describes people with allergic tendencies: Eczema itself is not an allergic condition, however, there are certain triggers that people are sensitive to which cause eczema symptoms, such as soaps, shower gels, washing powders, and animal hair. Eczema sufferers are also more likely to develop asthma and hay fever.

What are the causes?

In Eczema, the skin - which offers a protective barrier to our internal organs – is lacking fats and oils, which make the skin drier and unable to retain moisture which in return struggle to play its role of defence barrier. 

Eczema can affect people at any age but it typically develops in childhood and continues into adult life. Did you know that hereditary factors were very significant in developing Eczema? Studies show that if1 parent suffers from the condition, there is 30% chance for a child to get it, and it jumps to a whooping 70% if both parents have atopy. Environmental factors such as stress, pollution, weather change, diet can also worsen eczema.

Our recommended routine for eczema-prone skin

STEP 1. Cleanse with a gentle soap-free, fragrance-free and paraben-free face and body wash. 

Cleansing oils and creams textures can help alleviate dry skin symptoms and make skin more comfortable. Avoid as much as possible too long or warm showers. 

Bioderma Atoderm Intensive gel

Avene Xeracalm Cleansing oil

Mustela Stelatopia Cleansing Cream

STEP 2. Soothe irritations, itching and discomfort with Thermal water. 

Safe to use on the whole family and where and when moisturiser can be hard to use (eyelids, skin folds of babies, etc.)

Uriage Thermal water

Avene Thermal Spring water

STEP 3. Moisturise the skin twice daily with lipid-replenishing emollient.

Try to moisturise as soon as you get out of the shower to seal back all the moisture into the skin. Moisturising oils or balms are quite popular. Always look for a fragrance-free and paraben-free formula if you can to limit any allergic reaction. Our picks below:

Bioderma Intensive Balm

2-in-1 soothing and dermo strengthening moisturiser.

Avene Xeracalm Balm

Enriched with Soothing Avene Thermal Spring Water.

Mustela Stelatopia Balm

Specifically formulated for newborns and babies.

STEP 4. Treat locally dry patches and create an insulating barrier to help repair the damaged skin. 

From shaving to contact dermatitis and dribble rashes, these SOS products will help soothe and repair the skin.

Mustela Cicastela cream

Perfect for dribble rashes and dry patches in babies and children since birth.

Uriage Bariederm cream

Insulating barrier cream for contact dermatitis for the whole family.

Uriage Pruriced cream

With 8% calamine, purifying cream for itchy, dry and irritated skin.



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